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Oil platforms could pump CO2 into rocks under the sea

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Oil platforms modified to pump carbon dioxide into the rocks below the seafloor: this is a project that a group of scientists from the University of Edinburgh is working on. The latter have discovered that the current disused oil platforms can still be very useful without at the same time being harmful to the environment in terms of carbon dioxide pollution.

According to the calculations made by the scientists, the modifications to be made to the oil platforms so that they can function as pumping stations for CO 2 storage sites would even be 10 times cheaper than the safe deactivation itself, a highly regulated process that requires several phases. The researchers have in particular analyzed the oil field of Beatrice, located 24 miles north-east of the Scottish coast and have evidently come to the conclusion that it is feasible.

The decommissioning of this field should cost, according to the press release on the University of Edinburgh website, over 260 million pounds. Using this field as a pumping station to cram carbon dioxide for thirty years, you would spend 10 times less.

Researchers have discovered that much electricity can still be generated using natural gas and thermal energy that can still be extracted from saltwater in oil or exhaust gas fields. By mixing the saltwater of the oil field with the CO 2 resulting from the natural gas combustion process, it is possible to inject that carbon dioxide safely and permanently into the depths of the subsoil.

Jonathan Scafidi, a researcher at the School of Geosciences of the University of Edinburgh, lead author of the study, states the following: “The removal of high-cost platforms is short-sighted. Reusing them to dispose of CO 2 in rocks for several kilometers below the seafloor will not only be cheaper, but will provide an economic means of reducing UK CO 2 emissions to reach the Net-zero 2050 target.”

Alice Stevens

I am a journalism student and WordPress developer with strong skills in PHP/MySQL. Along with writing content and new stories for Jubobarta News, I also help out with the website and hosting when needed.

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Efficient hybrid tandem solar cells created by Korean scientists

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High-efficiency tandem photovoltaic devices with quantum colloidal solar cells and photoactive materials of organic mass heterogjunction have been developed by a team of UNIST researchers led by Professor Sung-Yeon Jang.
The colloidal quantum solar cells (CQD) have soon attracted considerable attention in the field of photovoltaic energy because they are flexible and lightweight, easier to manufacture than conventional silicon solar cells and without loss of efficiency.

Quantum dots are nanoscopic-sized semiconductor particles. They have various useful and interesting characteristics, primarily an emission wavelength that depends on the size.
Basically, quantum points can absorb light in the near infrared, something that other cells and active photo layers cannot do.

Jang’s research team has developed a new photoactive quantum point technology that compensates for the loss of external quantum efficiency in the near infrared region. They also used an intermediate layer to achieve power conversion efficiency. These new tandem hybrid solar cells are made at room temperature and therefore their manufacture is cheaper than silicon solar cells.
“The hybrid tandem device has shown almost negligible degradation after storing air for three months,” says Jang himself.

Alice Stevens

I am a journalism student and WordPress developer with strong skills in PHP/MySQL. Along with writing content and new stories for Jubobarta News, I also help out with the website and hosting when needed.

3203 Goosetown Drive, Hickory North Carolina, 28601
828-624-1374
[email protected]
Alice Stevens

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A new species of turtle in Texas that lived almost 100 million years ago has been classified

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Analyzing the remains found at the Arlington Archosaur Site, a site with various fossil remains from the late Cretaceous period in Texas, a team of researchers described four species of extinct turtles, one of which is named after paleontologist Derek Main.

This site was discovered in 2003 and proved to be a prolific location for late Cretaceous remains, remnants of life forms that lived more than 90 million years ago. It is a wetland located near the shore of a peninsula and already in the past has provided several fossils of ancient crocodiles, dinosaurs, mammals, amphibians, fish, invertebrates and even plants.

However, the turtle fossils discovered at this site had proved quite rare, at least until this study that was published in Palaeontology Electronica. The new species was named Trinitichelys maini. It is a Baenidae turtle, an extinct group of North American aquatic turtles that lived from the Cretaceous to the Eocene era.

Of medium size, these turtles showed strongly fused bones and upper shell and lived near rivers. The Trinitichelys maini is the oldest turtle of this group found in the North American subcontinent of Appalachia, a region that during the Cretaceous period was separated from Laramidia, the western subcontinent of North America.

In addition to the new classification, researchers described three other turtles, one of which is the oldest side-necked turtle (Pleurodira order) ever found in North America. These turtles are characterized by the particular way they withdraw their heads inside their shells: they do so by bending their necks on the horizontal plane.

The other two turtles described are one belonging to the group of trionichids (Trionychidae), or soft-shelled turtles, and another belonging to the genus Naomichelys (family Helochelydridae ).

Alice Stevens

I am a journalism student and WordPress developer with strong skills in PHP/MySQL. Along with writing content and new stories for Jubobarta News, I also help out with the website and hosting when needed.

3203 Goosetown Drive, Hickory North Carolina, 28601
828-624-1374
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Key mechanism of epilepsy in Angelman syndrome discovered by researchers

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In the course of research defined as “innovative,” a team of researchers from the Duke-NUS Medical School and the National Neuroscience Institute (NNI), Singapore, discovered a mechanism considered to be basic with regard to epilepsy in Angelman syndrome. This discovery, according to the researchers themselves, could lead to new therapies in the future.

Angelman’s syndrome (AS) is a rare genetic disease due to a defect in the process of chromosome duplication, often accompanied by delays in psychological and motor development, cognitive disabilities and other symptoms including epilepsy. In the course of the study, researchers at the Singapore Institutes used a new experimental methodology with human neural cells and brain organelles to understand the mechanism of epileptic seizures in this syndrome.

The researchers discovered the role of the ion channel in the hyperactivity of the brain network that triggers convulsions. The latter would be linked to gene deficiency of the ubiquitin ligase protein E3A (UBE3A) within neurons. As this is a syndrome that cannot be treated at present, this discovery could, therefore, be very important.

“Our study used 2D human neuronal cultures that allowed the accelerated discovery of functional differences at the single-cell level in the brain of normal individuals compared to those with AS,” explains Hyunsoo Shawn Je, the senior author of the study. “The use of mini 3D human brains allowed us to monitor spontaneous network activities, linking the results of abnormal firing from individual neurons and convulsive-like activities, just like those observed in the brains of AS patients.”

Alice Stevens

I am a journalism student and WordPress developer with strong skills in PHP/MySQL. Along with writing content and new stories for Jubobarta News, I also help out with the website and hosting when needed.

3203 Goosetown Drive, Hickory North Carolina, 28601
828-624-1374
[email protected]
Alice Stevens

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